Jennie Lynn Clark

Jennie Lynn Clark

Clark Law and Associates, LLC
  • Personal Injury, Animal & Dog Law, Criminal Law...
  • Oregon, Washington
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Summary

Member of the Oregon State Bar since 2000 Member of the Oregon Federal Bar since 2000 Member of Washington State Bar since 2010. I practice in a variety of areas of the law, which is useful when there are overlapping legal issues. We offer a free phone consultation for the following types of cases:
Personal Injury
Motor vehicle accidents
Dog bites
Premises/Product Liability
Criminal Defense
Criminal Expungements
Police Misconduct
Breach of Contract
For landlord/tenant cases, we must do a consultation prior to taking information, as we represent both landlords and tenants. Our initial consultation for landlord/tenant matters is $200.00 with our normal hourly rate of $300.00/hour thereafter or we sometimes accept cases on a contingency fee basis for tenants after the initial consultation. Please call (503) 238-1010 and do not email regarding landlord/tenant cases if you are not a current client.

Practice Areas
  • Personal Injury
  • Animal & Dog Law
  • Criminal Law
  • White Collar Crime
  • DUI & DWI
  • Domestic Violence
  • Civil Rights
  • Legal Malpractice
  • Landlord Tenant
Additional Practice Areas
  • Car Accidents
  • General Civil
Fees
  • Credit Cards Accepted
  • Contingent Fees
    I only accept contingency fees in personal injury cases.
  • Rates, Retainers and Additional Information
    Landlord Tenant Cases: We charge $200.00 for the first hour for landlord/tenant consultations and our normal rates apply thereafter. For tenants we sometimes accept cases on a contingency fee basis after the initial consultation fee is paid. Criminal Defense: Flat fee or hourly Stalking/Restraining Orders: Flat fee or hourly. Expungements: Flat fees
Jurisdictions Admitted to Practice
Oregon
Washington
9th Circuit
Languages
  • English: Spoken, Written
Professional Experience
Managing Attorney
Clark Law and Associates, LLC
Current
Education
University of California Hastings College of the Law
J.D. / Juris Doctoral (1997)
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Activities: Women's Law Journal
Portland State University
B.S. / Philosophy
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Honors: Incidental Fee Committee Chair Person
Wallace High School
High School Valedictorian / General (1984)
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Honors: Valedictorian
Awards
Trademark Who's Who Honors Edition
Who's Who
Member ID 115952
Professional Associations
Oregon State Bar # 000319
Member
Current
Oregon Trial Lawyers Association
member
- Current
OCDLA
member
- Current
Oregon Federal Bar
- Current
Certifications
Juris Doctoral Degree
Hastings College of the Law
Websites & Blogs
Website
Website
Website
Legal Answers
11 Questions Answered

Q. Do i have a case If i broke my leg in a apartment parking lot due to ice/snow I had surgery and i am unable to work?
A: Depending on your relationship to the apartment complex and the circumstances, you may have a claim under the landlord/tenant act if you are within the one year statute of limitations, which is 1 year from the incident date. The landlord tenant act allows for reciprocal attorney fees under ORS 90.255. This means that if you prevail after a lawsuit is filed the other side had to pay your attorney fees. However, if you lose you have to pay their attorney fees. Depending on local statutes, there may be some statutory negligence in which you would have a two year statute of limitations in Oregon. If we determine there is a reasonable basis for liability, we consider these cases on a contingency fee basis.
Q. How would i go about talk to the apartment complex about the bills. what is the best way?
A: You also may have a claim under the landlord/tenant act ORS if your fall was a result of failing to keep the common areas safe. Claims under the landlord/tenant act have reciprocal attorney fees, meaning the loser pays the winner's attorney fees. You have a one year statute of limitations from the date of the incident under the Oregon Landlord tenant act. Sometimes there are also local statutes in relation to snow and ice your landlord might have been in violating. Our firm regularly handles landlord/tenant cases and negligence cases. We handle injury claims on a contingency basis if we determine there is liability. If there is liability under a local statute or if we determine there was common law negligence, you may be entitled to non-economic damages for your inconvenience and pain and suffering and wage loss, if any.
Q. We loaned a van to our daughter and son-in-law in CA with the intent of giving it to them if they liked it. They have
A: You are probably not liable. However, I would need to ask some follow up questions to verify this. If you had reason to know that you were loaning the car to someone unqualified to drive, such as not having a driver's license or loaning it to someone you know is under the influence of intoxicants, you could be liable. Since the vehicle is insured, you likely have no liability unless it could be shown you were negligent in some way by lending your vehicle to your daughter and son-in-law. Note: Under an Oregon policy the driver and passenger should have $15k of no-fault personal injury protection for medical bills. There also should be money available under an Oregon policy for partial wage loss reimbursement if either person insured by an Oregon Policy had to miss work for more than a couple weeks.
Q. Carport collapsed on car due to to much snow and property managment says its an act of god like tree falling? true?
A: If you are a tenant, you might also have a claim under your lease/rental agreement for breach of your agreement to maintain the premises, depending on the contract. The landlord also has a duty under ORS 90 to maintain the premises in a habitable condition. So I would like to know exactly what you were renting, if anything. Under ORS 90.255 there are attorney fees available to the prevailing party after a lawsuit is filed. I recently handled a case like this and we filed a lawsuit and I received my attorney fees. You have a one year statute of limitations under the landlord/tenant act which is less time than a general negligence claim, which is two years. It is true that you could go through your own insurance, if you have coverage for such damage; however, you would have to pay your deductible.
Q. I took my vehicle to a body shop to get fixed and the shop I took it too did not fix my car.
A: I would need some follow up information in order to answer this question. Did you have a written or verbal contract with the original body shop? Was there an agreement of a time period to fix your car? Did they do any diagnostic work that was contracted for. What is the body shop's justification for charging you a fee? If they performed no services and have no contract that give them a deadline to perform the services, they have no basis to get paid.
Q. I took my 4 month old puppy in to Dove Lewis he was diagnosed with PARVO, Im currently unemployed have no income so the
A: Maybe you should finish the paper work so your dog can live, then go adopt your dog from the humane society or have a friend do so if you cannot afford it. At least if your dog is alive, you have a little time to ask for some charitable donations so you can pay to adopt your dog. Let them know you want to adopt your dog.
Q. My ex bought me a puppy.I pd her back but now she wants to sell him.Akc and registration are in my name.
A: Since the vet, registration, a.k.c. papers are all in your name, there is evidence she purchased the dog as a gift for you. If you paid her back for the dog then you definitely own the dog, although it sounds like you might have a difficult time proving this, as you stated there was no written agreement between the two of you. Obviously, she has the power to physically take him. The issue is whether she has the RIGHT to take him. I don't believe she has the right to take him if she purchased him initially as a gift for you and you later paid her back for the purchase price.
Q. Can I legally obtain my dog from my father if I can begin paying for my dogs insurance and register him under my name?
A: If you were to take the dog, you could claim the dog is a gift, as he told you the dog was yours and you have a witness. Since he is your father, there is a stronger presumption that the dog is a gift. However, since your father registered that dog in his name, this could be evidence that he did not give you the dog as a gift. However, he likely registered the dog in his name, as I presume you were a minor child at the time he registered the dog. In my view there is a slim chance you would be charged with a crime if you were to take your dog. If you were charged with a crime, you would have a reasonable defense. I could be wrong, but I cannot imagine a jury would be willing to convict a girl for taking her childhood dog, which she understood to be a gift.
Q. Who gets the pups leagaly?
A: It is your dog and your pups. Owners that allow their dogs to trespass on the dogs of others have no legal claim. You could make a claim for trespass; however, it appears that you have not been harmed by the trespass, as you have stated the pups are worth $600.00 each.
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Contact & Map
6501 SW Macadam Ave Suite E
6501 SW Macadam Ave Suite E
Portland, OR 97239
USA
Telephone: (503) 238-1010
Fax: (503) 238-1212