Free Consultation: (810) 299-5222Tap to Call This Lawyer
Kenneth V Zichi

Kenneth V Zichi

Kenneth V . Zichi J.D.
  • Elder Law, Estate Planning, Family Law...
  • Michigan
Badges
Claimed Lawyer ProfileQ&ASocial Media
Summary

Helping Livingston County residents navigate the legal system for 30 years. I focus on Wills, Trusts, Estate Planning and Probate, with a significant portion of my practice also concerning Real Estate and general civil litigation. If you have questions or issues with your home, a cabin up north, or want to insure your family is cared for after you are gone, I'd be happy to meet with you, perhaps bust some myths, and certainly insure YOUR and your family's needs are met. Call for an appointment today!

Practice Areas
  • Elder Law
  • Estate Planning
  • Family Law
  • Insurance Claims
  • Landlord Tenant
  • Real Estate Law
  • Divorce
Fees
  • Free Consultation
    Telephone or office conferences, 20 minutes or less. Longer conferences may incur a minimal fee.
  • Credit Cards Accepted
  • Contingent Fees
Jurisdictions Admitted to Practice
Michigan
Languages
  • English: Spoken, Written
Professional Experience
Owner
Kenneth V . Zichi J.D.
- Current
Mayor
City of Williamston (Michigan)
-
Education
University of Michigan - Ann Arbor
J.D.
-
University of Michigan - Ann Arbor
A.B. / History / Communications
-
Honors: LS&A Honors College 1977-1979
Professional Associations
State Bar of Michigan
Member
- Current
estate and probate section Michigan bar
member
- Current
Law and Media committee - State Bar of Michigan
member
-
Speaking Engagements
Newsroom Seminar, WNEM TV/AM - Saginaw MI
State Bar of Michigan - Law & Media committee
An hour-long seminar addressing some of the common practical and substantive difficulties journalists encounter in covering the legal system in Michigan.
Websites & Blogs
Website
Website
Website
Avvo.com
Legal Answers
430 Questions Answered

Q. Are all investment accounts like 401Ks and IRAs subject to being taxed to people I've willed them to, even if I have
A: You have NOT paid tax on traditional IRAs or 401(k)s by definition. You don't pay tax on them until you remove the money from them which you have to start doing at a specific age if you haven't already begun to do so. This 'withdrawal' requirement is because the government allows you to DEFER paying taxes, but they want you to pay them eventually. If YOU don't withdraw all the money before you die, you may list people as beneficiaries and then THEY have to pay the tax as they withdraw money from the account. If you DON'T name a beneficiary YOUR ESTATE must withdraw ALL the money and distribute it according to your estate plan, but ALL the tax is due at that point instead of being spread out over time which can be done if you name beneficiaries. If this doesn't make sense, I would urge you to consult with a local estate planning attorney and ask this question until you get a response that DOES make sense to you! This is not 'complicated' but it is 'detailed' and you need to understand what you're doing to insure your heirs (and you!) don't pay more tax than you need to. --This answer is offered for informational purposes only and does not constitute legal advice or create an attorney/client relationship. I am licensed to practice in Michigan only. Please seek competent local legal help if you feel you need legal advice!
Q. Real Estate law: What are my rights or Obligations under my contract, when dealing with a Bully for an Agent In Mich?
A: If the service you've received does not comport with the agreement you signed, you MAY be able to get out of the listing contract. Because you are 'dissatisfied' or feel like you're being 'bullied' is not enough -- there needs to be an objective failure to provide the services you contracted to receive. (E.g. if there is no listing in the multilist book x weeks after the contract, and that is specifically called for in the listing agreement... etc.) Without seeing the listing agreement it is impossible to know what you can and cannot do, and I'd urge you to consult with a local real estate lawyer to help sort things out. You SHOULD have consulted a lawyer before signing the contract, but that is water under the bridge at this point. You BEST option may be to hire a different agent, and have that agent work with the previous one to cancel the original contract. Again, don't enter into an agreement with the second agent without having that reviewed by a lawyer either! There are lots of options, but without seeing the agreement you have now, it is impossible to know what you should or even can do. Seek local legal help! --This answer is offered for informational purposes only and does not constitute legal advice or create an attorney/client relationship. I am licensed to practice in Michigan only. Please seek competent local legal help if you feel you need legal advice!
Q. Can my neighbour dig a my waste pipe up that was agreed to be laid under his garden?
A: I'm assuming you are in the UK. This forum is for US law questions, and you're unlikely to find someone versed in your country's laws! I'd suggest looking for a forum in the UK or better yet, contact a solicitor in your area to get some real legal advice! --This answer is offered for informational purposes only and does not constitute legal advice or create an attorney/client relationship. I am licensed to practice in Michigan only. Please seek competent local legal help if you feel you need legal advice!
Q. Can the distrubtion of a trust be held up because 2 of the 7 beneficiaries are contesting the trust
A: Absolutely yes. If the trust is being contested -- legally -- then distribution would HAVE to be delayed pending the outcome of the challenge! One of the big 'myths' of trust vs probate administration is that 'you can't challenge a trust' ... as you've noted -- of COURSE you can challenge a trust! Not only that, but if someone does challenge the trust, it goes to the same court to resolve the challenge that would handle a probate estate, with essentially the same if not higher costs than probate would entail. Be sure you know what you're doing and you have competent legal help both in preparation of trusts and wills and in responding to challenges if one happens! -- This answer is offered for informational purposes only and does not constitute legal advice or create an attorney/client relationship. I am licensed to practice in Michigan only. Please seek competent local legal help if you feel you need legal advice
Q. Mom wants to leave her house to we three children, stipulating that it can then only be sold if all three agree.
A: There ARE ways to insure this happens as you've described. It will not be possible with a 'simple' gift however. Your MOTHER (assuming she owns the house as her sole property) should consult with a local estate planning lawyer to determine what combination of ladybird deed, trust and/or will needs to be used and how it can best protect her during her lifetime, and also pass the property to those she wants to receive it after her passing. I'm not sure what KY law allows so it is VITAL that you get with a local attorney who can provide you real legal advice! -- This answer is offered for informational purposes only and does not constitute legal advice or create an attorney/client relationship. I am licensed to practice in Michigan only. Please seek competent local legal help if you feel you need legal advice
Q. Does the Executor of the will have any legal responsibility to communicate with the other beneficiaries? Any time frame?
A: Yes, and there are specific obligations as to what documents need to be prepared and in what time frame they need to be filed with the court and shared with the heirs/beneficiaries. If you are asking this I assume you do not have a local lawyer. You SHOULD! The 'value add' of having a lawyer help you is 1) you get answers to things like this immediately, and 2) you have someone who knows what is required in YOUR location to insure things happen properly. I'd urge you to consult with a local attorney ASAP to insure things go smoothly and you proceed as appropriate! Don't be 'penny wise and pound foolish'! You will ultimately save time money and hassle by hiring someone to help you! -- This answer is offered for informational purposes only and does not constitute legal advice or create an attorney/client relationship. I am licensed to practice in Michigan only. Please seek competent local legal help if you feel you need legal advice
Q. Grandmother passes away. Everything goes to me and my Brother. He's broke. I paid for the funeral, not much equity.
A: If I may be so bold, you can't afford to NOT hire an attorney to help you with this. If indeed you want to assume a loan (I assume associated with some property that you want to keep) you can do that in many cases, but you have to approach the process properly, and insure you have AUTHORITY to do that, particularly if there is more than one heir. Did your grandmother leave a will? Who is named in it to handle here estate? Are there CHILDREN instead of just grandchildren left? There are MANY unanswered questions that need to be explored before an answer to 'what should I do' can be attempted. Seek local legal help to explore all those questions, and get yourself in a better position to know what to do. -- This answer is offered for informational purposes only and does not constitute legal advice or create an attorney/client relationship. I am licensed to practice in Michigan only. Please seek competent local legal help if you feel you need legal advice
Q. My parents divorced, my father remarried and left me $1, I'm his only heir. Can I contest the will?
A: Anyone with a few hundred dollars to petition a court CAN contest a will, but I bet the question you wanted to ask is 'will it make sense for me to contest the will'. The answer to that is 'probably not'. Unless you can show your father was not of sound mind, or that he was 'unduly influenced' (think 'gun to the head') when he made the will cutting you out, there isn't likely going to be a legal basis for challenging the will. He can cut out a child for any reason, or no reason at all, provided he knows what he's doing, and that is that. -- This answer is offered for informational purposes only and does not constitute legal advice or create an attorney/client relationship. I am licensed to practice in Michigan only. Please seek competent local legal help if you feel you need legal advice
Q. Son of divorced parents died intestate with no other heirs. Dad won't agree for mom to be admin. Can she get around it?
A: The first question you must ask is do you WANT to begin probate. If the debts are about the same as or more than the assets, it makes sense to simply let the DEBTORS begin the probate, and collect what they are owed. If they get more than they are owed, they must turn it over to heirs/devisees, but in the mean time, if the (likely) will get less than is owed (when attorneys and court fees are considered) then they have at least saved the family from the expense. If a family member (mother?) has paid for funeral expenses this is likely a 'priority claim' against the estate and she can file a claim to be reimbursed and again, it is the creditors who will be paying. Don't get so involved in the family dynamic of exes fighting that you miss the important question: SHOULD we do this at all? .... I'd urge you to consult with a local probate attorney to review the WHOLE situation to determine what can and should be done. That consultation won't be expensive and it could save you a LOT of money, time and headache! -- This answer is offered for informational purposes only and does not constitute legal advice or create an attorney/client relationship. I am licensed to practice in Michigan only. Please seek competent local legal help if you feel you need legal advice
Click here to see all answers
Social Media
Contact & Map
211 E Grand River Ave
Howell, MI 48843
USA
Telephone: (810) 299-5222
Cell: (517) 258-8020